Goats - miniature cows!

The American Goat Society (AGS) has a similar, but not identical scorecard that is used in their shows. The miniature dairy goats may be judged by either of the two scorecards. The "Angora Goat scorecard" used by the Colored Angora Goat Breeder's Association (CAGBA), which covers the white and the colored goats, includes evaluation of an animal's fleece color, density, uniformity, fineness, and general body confirmation. Disqualifications include: a deformed mouth, broken down pasterns, deformed feet, crooked legs, abnormalities of testicles, missing testicles, more than 3 inch split in scrotum, and close-set or distorted horns.

Goats are herbivores, which means they eat only vegetation. Their favorite food is grass, though mountain goats also eat mosses and plants. Many domestic goats will also eat trash, house plants or any other items they find lying around.

Goats grab food with their lips and bring it into their mouths, according to the Smithsonian. The upper jaw is wider than the lower jaw, so they can only use one side of their mouths to grind the food. This causes the rotary movement that is seen when a goat (or a cow) is chewing.

Goats typically spend their days grazing on grasses within their home range, which is an area of about 14 square miles (23 square kilometers), according to the ADW. Mountain goats will dig 1 to 1 inch (25 to 50 mm) depressions in the ground to sleep, rest and dust bathe in.

Goats are ruminants. They have a four-chambered stomach consisting of the rumen, the reticulum, the omasum, and the abomasum. As with other mammal ruminants, they are even-toed ungulates. The females have an udder consisting of two teats, in contrast to cattle, which have four teats.[12] An exception to this is the Boer goat, which sometimes may have up to eight teats.[13][14][15]

Mountain goats can weigh from 125 to 180 lbs. (57 to 82 kilograms) and grow from 49 to 70 inches (124 to 178 centimeters) long. Their black horns grow up to 8 to 12 inches (20 to 30 cm) long. They do not shed their horns, so a goat's age can be determined by counting the annual growth rings. Both males and female mountain goats have horns, according to the Animal Diversity Web (ADW) at the University of Michigan.

Probably first domesticated in the East, perhaps during prehistoric times, the goat has long been used as a source of milk, cheese, mohair, and meat. Its skin has been valued as a source for leather. In China, Great Britain, Europe, and North America, the…

A male goat is called a buck or a billy, unless it is castrated, and then it is called a wether. Female goats, also called nannies or does, give birth to one or two offspring in the spring after a gestation period of 150 to 180 days. Baby goats are called kids.

The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages feeding infants milk derived from goats. An April 2010 case report[47] summarizes their recommendation and presents "a comprehensive review of the consequences associated with this dangerous practice", also stating, "Many infants are exclusively fed unmodified goat's milk as a result of cultural beliefs as well as exposure to false online information. Anecdotal reports have described a host of morbidities associated with that practice, including severe electrolyte abnormalities, metabolic acidosis, megaloblastic anemia, allergic reactions including life-threatening anaphylactic shock, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and infections." Untreated caprine brucellosis results in a 2% case fatality rate. According to the USDA, doe milk is not recommended for human infants because it contains "inadequate quantities of iron, folate, vitamins C and D, thiamine, niacin, vitamin B6, and pantothenic acid to meet an infant’s nutritional needs" and may cause harm to an infant's kidneys and could cause metabolic damage.